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Gluten Intolerance

 

Nearly one third of the world's population get half their nutrition from a single grain - wheat. Containing B and E vitamins, minerals and fibre, whole grains are also great at soaking up toxicity.
However, the rise in gluten intolerance means it's probably wise to avoid eating high-gluten grains too frequently. Millet is the only non-acid-forming grain. Believed to be good for the spleen and recharging your battery, it is non-glutinous and has good levels of magnesium and iron. It can also be used to make gluten free porridge or makes a great accompaniment to a casserole.
Quinoa (technically a seed) contains all the essential amino acids so is a complete protein. A good summer grain, it is light, cooks quickly and has a nutty taste (see recipe below).
Pot barley, which is the whole grain, unrefined version of pearl barley, contains little gluten and is good for digestion, making stews and soups more substantial. Many Scots used to thrive on a diet of barley, oats and fish.
Brown rice is great for rehydration, soothes the nervous system and nourishes the lungs and colon. We prefer short grain; mixed with pre-soaked seeds and some fresh greens and oil, brown rice is great for a meal on the go.
If you want wheat, try Kamut - wheat-sensitive people can often tolerate kamut which also has better minerals levels. Kamut couscous is particularly delicious! This is an expensive option though and we haven't tried it in baking - if you do please let us know.
When eaten with pulses, whole grains provide a complete range of amino acids at good levels.
Though they are so much a part of our western diet, grains don't in fact suit everyone: mental illness has been associated with undetected coeliac conditions, and if you are blood group O you may not find grains easy to digest. Millet and brown rice are the least challenging of the grains, so try these.

Nearly one third of the world's population get half their nutrition from a single grain - wheat. Containing B and E vitamins, minerals and fibre, whole grains are also great at soaking up toxicity.

However, the rise in gluten intolerance means it's probably wise to avoid eating high-gluten grains too frequently.

  • Millet is the only non-acid-forming grain. Believed to be good for the spleen and recharging your battery, it is non-glutinous and has good levels of magnesium and iron. It can also be used to make gluten free porridge or makes a great accompaniment to a casserole
  • Quinoa (technically a seed) contains all the essential amino acids so is a complete protein. A good summer grain, it is light, cooks quickly and has a nutty taste
  • Pot barley, the whole grain, unrefined version of pearl barley, contains little gluten and is good for digestion, making stews and soups more substantial. Many Scots used to thrive on a diet of barley, oats and fish
  • Brown rice is great for rehydration, soothes the nervous system and nourishes the lungs and colon. We prefer short grain; mixed with pre-soaked seeds and fresh greens and oil, brown rice is great for a meal on the go
  • Kamut - wheat-sensitive people can often tolerate kamut which also has better minerals levels. Kamut couscous is particularly delicious! This is an expensive option though and we haven't tried it in baking - if you do please let us know

When eaten with pulses, whole grains provide a complete range of amino acids at good levels.

Though they are so much a part of our western diet, grains don't in fact suit everyone: mental illness has been associated with undetected coeliac conditions, and if you are blood group O you may not find grains easy to digest. Millet and brown rice are the least challenging of the grains, so try these.

      

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