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What does MG mean?

In 2008, scientific evidence confirmed that methylglyoxal (“MG”) is one of the key natural compounds in New Zealand manuka honey. The presence of MG was found to  correlate stongly with observed characteristics of manuka honey to inhibit bacteria.  As high levels of methylglyoxal were not found in other honeys, it is also considered by many to be one of the markers of genuine manuka honey. MG occurs naturally  - but at different concentrations-  so it is more rare at the higher concentration levels which is traditionally more expensive.

The advantage of testing for "MG" is because it is a naturally occurring and stable compound, it can be reliably detected and quantified using validated scientific measurement. 

We use MG  because this is the terminology that is actually used on the lab certificates of analysis we obtain to check the honey that we buy from beekeeper suppliers. MG isn’t a registered trade mark which means Green Bay does not pay marketing royalties for the use of industry trade marks - the cost of which is then passed to the consumer.

Genuine Manuka Honey is tested and rated for its MG content as measured in these lab tests. Green Bay Harvest obtains a lab certificate for all its Manuka Honey. The lab certificate reports the level of methylglyoxal in the sample, measured in "mg/kg" (which equates to perhaps more famliar terminolgy "parts per million"). 

 

Why did you change from NPA to MG on your labels?

In 2015, the New Zealand Government Department associated with food production in New Zealand an Interim Labelling Guide for Manuka Honey (“the Guide”). The Guide was produced to address concerns about the type of information appearing on some manuka honey labels. At the same time also took the step of prohibiting terminolgy such as "Non Peroxide Activity" - as well as more recent terms like "Active" and "Total Activity" because it was considered that these were "implied health claims".


The Canadian Food Inspection Agency also reviewed the format of our “MG” honey labels.

 

Converting to “new” MG from “old” NPA scale

The widely accepted correlation/conversion of MG to NPA is in the following table:

 

 

MG Level

NPA (or UMF)

≥83 mg/kg

5

100 mg/kg

5.7

250 mg/kg

9.7

≥263 mg/kg

10

≥514 mg/kg

15

 

Can you trust the rating?

We are family business, and as owners we work directly in the business. We keep bees in our backyard ourselves. We have an office and warehouse in Christchurch, New Zealand where all our buying is centralised with a long standing network of bee keepers whom we know personally and trust. 

 

 

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In 2008, scientific evidence confirmed that methylglyoxal (“MG”) is one of the key natural compounds in New Zealand manuka honey.  As it is a naturally occurring and stable compound, it can be reliably detected and quantified using validated scientific measurement.  As high levels of methylglyoxal are not present in other honeys, it is also one of the markers of genuine manuka honey. MG occurs naturally  - but at different concentrations-  so it is more rare at the higher concentration levels which is traditionally more expensive.
      

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